English grammar explained using clear and simple explanations.

Modal verbs of Probability – must, might, may and could

Impossible (0%) Possible (50%) Only possibility (100%) can’t might may could must We use modal verbs of probability when we have thought about something and we say the possibility of something happening. We don’t know for a fact but, having thought about it we can say what we believe. Might, could and may all have the same meaning, namely that’s it’s possible. We use might and could more […]

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Introduction to Modal verbs

The following are all modal verbs: can, could, may, might, must, ought to, shall, should, will, would. General things to remember about moda lverbs 1. They stay the same in every form. We never add -s. Examples He should go. She would love it. It will be great. 2. After the modal verb we always use the base form of the main verb. Examples I can drive. You could see. She must save all her salary. This is true also in the past when […]

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It takes …

Look at this sentence: It takes me 20 minutes to drive to work. When we talk about how long we need to do something we say “It takes …” It to take object pronoun / name time infinitive of verb It took them 1 hour to do the test. It takes us 1 week to get everything ready. It will […]

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Irregular Verbs (complete list)

Here is a complete list of irregular verbs in English: Base Form Past Simple Past Participle awake awoke awoken be was/were been bear bore born beat beat beat become became become begin began begun bend bent bent beset beset beset bet bet bet bid bid/bade bid/bidden bind bound bound bite bit bitten bleed bled bled blow blew blown break broke […]

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Common Irregular Verbs

Below is a list of the most common irregular verbs in English: Base Form Past Simple Past Participle be was/were been become became become begin began begun break broke broken bring brought brought build built built buy bought bought can could been able to catch caught caught choose chose chosen come came come cost cost cost cut cut cut do […]

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Irregular Adverbs

Generally to make an adverb we add –ly Adjective Adverb quick slow sudden interesting willing quickly slowly suddenly interestingly willingly He was running quickly. She walks slowly. He entered the room suddenly. I went to the party willingly. There are a few irregular adverbs: Adjective Adverb daily early fast good hard late daily early fast well hard late The newspaper comes out daily. He gets up early. They […]

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Have and have got

There is no difference in meaning between these two sentences: I have a car. I‘ve got a car. The important thing is not to mix the two forms. If you use the “have” form, have is the main verb and so to make a question or negative sentence, we need an auxiliary verb: Have Tense Positive Negative Question Present simple I have a […]

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Different forms of have

Have is sometimes a main verb and sometimes an auxiliary verb. When have is a main verb, the auxiliary verb is not have (unless we are using the present perfect) so we have to use a different auxiliary verb. Look at these sentences: Have as main verb Action verb Positive Negative Question I have a shower every day I don’t […]

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The Future – Differences between going to, present continuous and will

Basically we use to be going to when we intend to do something, we are probably going to do it but we have not confirmed it 100%. I‘m going to watch the match tonight. I‘m going to meet my friends tomorrow. I‘m going to eat pizza tonight. If I now call the pizzeria to book a table for two for 8 o’clock this evening […]

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